How to Lock your Toddler’s Ipad using Guided Access!

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Matthew Keisler weight bearing in his stander while enjoying his ipad!

Matthew Keisler weight bearing in his stander while enjoying his ipad!

Let’s face it! While the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no child under two should be using any devices or viewing screens of any kind, they are! As parents we use phones, iPads and televisions to occupy these little ones daily. Children as young as two can navigate an iPhone to pull up a parents photos and scan through them like a pro! However as quickly as they learn to navigate our devices, they learn to touch the home button and exit out of apps. If this is a problem for you, follow these easy steps below to use guided access on your I devices.

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What One Thing Would you want if Going on a Trip?!

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WordPress has a prompt a day! This is it for today!

You’re embarking on a yearlong round-the-world adventure, and can take only one small object with you to remind you of home. What do you bring along for the trip?

What would you want?! Initially I’d say a picture of my family because after all, they are home. But after further consideration Id say my iPad! Then I could have multiple pictures, games, and tons of other cool things!

As I continued to think about this I’m faced with the daunting reality that our children would have said iPad first. You see, our children are addicted to screens! Televisions, iPads, phones… They all teach, babysit and let’s face it, give us time to get done all the things we parents need or shall I say want to do.

Did you know the Academy of American Pediatrics recommends no screens until after age 2! check out this article on guidelines for media use. Screens are also increasing our children’s inability to sit still. Listen. Stay focused.

Three suggestions for families as we navigate through using and allowing media in our homes:

Model Self Control Make sure you take time to put the phone, remote & iPad down to actually interact with your family members!

No screens before age 2 young brains are actively being wired most during this age span. As convenient as screens are to you, your child is creating a complex neuro map with synapses and connections that last the rest of their lives. The brain is being molded by the use of screens in a negative way as it relates to attention and focus abilities.

Limit Screen time to 2 hours a day after age 2 create a plan for tv and iPad usage. Let that sink in folks! Not 2 hours of iPad time, two hours of total screen time!! That means parents if you know you’ll need a little help from a screen later in the day, you’ll have to find alternative engagement for your toddler in the morning. A token, could be a bottle top or a poker chip, system where they are given time for tv and iPad but once they spend their morning tokens, no more until afternoon. You may also need to use a timer so they hear and have an auditory cue that iPad time is over. Be consistent and they’ll begin to learn their are lots of fun things to do other than screens!

How to Make & Use Colored Rice!

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Our lead Occupational Therapist was getting bored with her white rice bins so she decided to spice it up a bit and add color! Below are several recipes but the last one has step by step directions for making a kaboodle full for your therapy toy library!

Easy Colored Rice:

1 pound bag of long grain rice

1 food coloring tube of your choice

Large zip top bagmadelyns rice

Place bag of uncooked rice in zip top bag.

Add 3 tablespoons to 1/2 a tube of food coloring to uncooked rice in zip top bag.

If you desire a deeper yellow or orange, add more coloring.

Seal bag and shake to evenly color your rice.

Spread colored rice on a cookie sheet over night to allow food coloring to dry.

Store in plastic boxes with lids for easy clean up and use.

Kaboodle fulls of Colored Rice!

To make large quantities of rice, you may want to follow this recipe as it disperses and sets the food coloring for pounds of rice!  We have seen recipes with vinegar in the place of the alcohol but then the vinegar smell is present in the containers.  Once the alcohol dries, the odor is gone.

Recipe:

5 lbs of rice

1 cup of rubbing alcohol (we made 10 lbs so we used 1 bottle of alcohol)

1/2 to 1 tube of food coloring (You can mix colors! We added yellow to the green to get our “Sprout” green!)

Large mix bowl or storage box with lid.

Plastic trash bag cut open or shower liner for rice to dry on over night.

Step 1 Supplies

Step 2 mix

Step 3 pour

Step 4 coat

Step 5 dry

Colored rice is a great therapy tool.  Here are 10 ways we use rice on a weekly basis at Sprout Pediatrics!

1.  Let children who have busy hands and like to touch everything – dig, pour, measure and play!

2.  Children who seem uneasy or whiny often times calm down to enjoy rice.  Hide small plastic food in the rice for discovery and describing!

3.  Hide farm animals and zoo animals for them to find and as they find them have them sort into a basket for categorizing!

4.  Bury various sizes of beads in the rice and as they find the beads have them string them for fine motor skills!

5.  Create a themed rice boxes that correspond to various holidays.  Use red rice, hearts, cards, etc. for Valentine’s Day!

6.  Have the rice on top of an outside stoop.  As they practice their stepping skills they have an opportunity to play in the rice for a minute!

7.  Talk about action words like pouring, dumping, covering, sifting, hiding as they play.  Say, “You are pouring, I am hiding.” Model simple sentences with action words.

8.  Provide spoons, old medicine cups, measuring cups for practice in scooping and filling various sizes of containers.

9.  Hide marbles or glass beads of different colors for some Math fun!  Ask “How many blue marbles did you find?” “How many green ones?” “How many all together?” 

10.  Don’t forget the funnels! You will love playing with the funnels as much as your child.  Laugh and Enjoy!

Last but not least, use recycled soda bottles and create I spy bottles.  Funnel rice in and find small objects your child will enjoy finding and put them in the bottle.  Super glue the top for safety!

I spy

Signs of SPD in Children – from Picky Eating to Temper Tantrums

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Because we work with many children who show signs of Sensory Processing Disorder, we thought it would be helpful to share this blog! If your child has persistent issues, an Occupational Therapist who specializes in Sensory Processing Disorder could be useful in making recommendations to help in this area. Give us a call if you feel your child may need to be seen by a professional. We’d love to help!

The Sensory Spectrum

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) affects five to ten percent of all children – an average of one child in every classroom.

Imagine having a child who finds hugs unbearable, or a child who throws temper tantrums virtually every time he or she is taken to a restaurant or store, or a child who refuses to eat. These behaviors are daily realities for more than three million children in the United States alone.

October is National Sensory Awareness Month. The Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) Foundation wants parents to know the Red Flags of SPD:

  •     Overly sensitive to touch, noises, smells, or movement
  •     Floppy or stiff body, clumsy, poor motor skills or handwriting
  •     Difficulty dressing, eating, sleeping, or toilet training
  •     Frequent or lengthy temper tantrums
  •     Easily distracted, fidgety, withdrawn, or aggressive
  •     Craves movement
  •     Easily overwhelmed

Most children with SPD are just as intelligent as their peers, and many are intellectually gifted. Not…

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Fun Equals Bronco Gait Trainer!

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Here’s Kailen showing off his newfound independence in a device called
a Bronco.  The Bronco is manufactured by Snug Seat.  Thankful for all the engineers that create such innovative products and that they know the importance of stability that allows independent mobility.  The Adaptive Mall is great resource for adaptive tools like the Bronco.  They share that the Bronco “allows upright weight bearing in a fully supported position. This gait trainer has a standard leg and foot separator that prevents “scissoring” of the legs while walking.”

We are excited for Kailen and all the fun he’s having outside playing and enjoying his new wheels!  Next goal: shooting hoops!