Why Aquatic Therapy is a “Must-Have” in Your Child’s PT Plan of Care!

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Our Physical and Occupational Therapy staff uses water and aquatic therapy in a variety of creative ways, to work towards functional therapeutic goals at home, as well as through our community partnership with the YMCA.

Avery TitleWater can generally be introduced very early, before 6 months of age, to encourage independence in skills. These skills include: erect sitting, transitioning to and from the floor, all fours and protective reaching. The resistive and buoyancy properties of water aid in body awareness, as well as neutralize low core stability and hypotonia using our baby pool program. Children who have retracted and tactile defensive postures and delayed protective reactions, especially benefit from the hydro-static pressure of the water and often learn to crawl in this medium.

Float MatThese skills can also be developed using a float mat in a typical aquatics setting, creating a moving seat on top of the water that relaxes and promotes participation in a non-stressful environment. The CDC has extensive research supporting the use of water in promoting health and mental health!

aquatic therapyFrom a very early age (6 months), children can be independent, mobile participants in a pool system at home or in a typical pool, by employing cost-effective products made by Waterway Babies. These products allow us to develop independent skills in the child with low tone or poor head control, before he or she is even sitting up on land. By introducing the neck float and water at this age, we typically avoid the fear of water associated with 12-15 month old children. This tool also develops a sense of body and spatial awareness through independence in the water, as well as core and tone development. Because the system is practical and easy to use at home, children do not lose water skills during winter months and for many, this is their only means of independence early!

Using our Transition to Wellness program in partnership with the YMCA, we are able to create diagnosis- specific goals, that ultimately prepare children with disabilities for water independence and a lot of fun. This is a particular effective medium for the child with hemiplegia or hypotonia, as the resistive properties of water activate the core muscle groups and work muscle groups that are typically in an abnormal neurological pattern. By using a decreasing flotation process, we are able to prepare children for inclusion in swim lessons through the YMCA and a lifetime of enjoyment of water activities, with the possibility of inclusion in water sports with their peers!

Welcome to 2015: Pediatric Therapy in Columbia, S.C.!

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We at Sprout Pediatrics are excited for a new year! A new year is a new beginning.  A time to start again.  A time to start something new.  A time to start fresh! While we at Sprout Pediatrics are always improving and expanding our company, we thought sharing out mission statement and why we chose specific words in the mission statement would help you understand our core values as a company as well as individuals!

Rhyno and Melanie co-treating with Steven!

Rhyno and Melanie co-treating with Steven!

“Sprout Pediatrics exists to cultivate hope in children and their families for a full life experience by surrounding them with innovative therapy, engaging education and connection within their community.”

Sprout Pediatrics began in April of 2012 and over the past few years, developed the mission statement above.  We choose to spend time and effort in developing those three key components: innovative therapy, engaging education and connection within the community.  You see, we don’t want to float from house to house and just deliver therapy. No! We want to deliver innovative therapy! Therapy that engages the clients we serve, as well as educate their families and other professionals we work alongside.  We also want to help families see the opportunities and places within our community that will also stretch and develop our clients.  After all, the end goal is a child who graduates from therapy and is filled with hope for a full life experience in the world around them!

So as we begin a new year, we are beginning something new! Actually, several somethings new!

  • We have a new office with a place for therapy! We’ll share more about this in the weeks to come.
  • We also are partnering with the YMCA of the Midlands to continue encouraging children to get #Sproutfit by being a part of sports team. The Challenger league is especially designed for kids who might need a “buddy coach” to help them participate with typical kids playing soccer, basketball and baseball.
  • The YMCA is also hosting a monthly meeting with speakers who will share specific information for families who have children with special needs.  We’ll post specific topics and dates soon!
  • Milestone Monday will be a blog we post monthly but highlight all through the month on Monday’s! We’ll share typical milestones, things you can do to encourage development and give you an opportunity to ask questions.

We hope you will follow us on Facebook, Linked In, Instagram and Twitter as we share success stories and educate through each of these social media outlets.  Let’s make it a great year!

NorthWest Family YMCA Pumkin Run 5K and Kids Fun Run

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Pumpkin Run Title

Hi Friends of Sprout!

It is that time again when we are creating a team to participate in the NW YMCA Pumpkin Run! Sprout Pediatrics once again is a sponsor for this great race that involves the whole family and includes a 5K run/walk ($20) and a kids fun run ($10 and less than a mile long). Last year our team had 100 participants from ages 2 to 70 including adults and children with disabilities doing the kids fun run with a chaperone. Our goal was to create a buzz through our #Sproutfit campaign for more inclusion, adaptive sports and programming. Did we ever! We had a great turn out and some heartwarming stories that followed.

Throughout this past year, we have met with the NW YMCA branch to develop plans and are very close to making some big announcements that will focus on serving families with special needs in our community with intentional programming! We have initiated a pilot program this fall that allows four children with special needs to participate in a regular soccer league with the aid of a volunteer called a Buddy!

Your participation in the race will help us move towards our goal to birth this program that will be funded by donors and events such as the Pumpkin Run.

Our goal for this year’s race is a team with 200 members made up by children and adults able and challenged. Sprout Pediatrics is committing additional funds that will be earmarked for this programming! Will you help us?

THE DEADLINE TO SIGN UP IS OCTOBER 10TH
We are creating Team Sprout stickers for race day to designate our team this year.  Hope to see you all there!!

Instructions to sign up with Team Sprout for the 2014 Pumpkin Run:
-Go to: http://www.strictlyrunning.com/gpscrlgnReg-9f.asp
-Click on YMCA Northwest Pumpkin Run, first, last name and date of birth
-Click on Group Registration and add to an existing group/team
-Click on Team Sprout and enter Captain name/email “rhyno77@gmail.com”
-Fill out your personal information and choose 5k run, 5k walk or kid fun run (if you are doing this with your young child as a helper you only need to register the child), T-shirt size
-Go to the next screen and pay to check out.

Thanks again for your support in this endeavor!

Sprout Pediatrics: On a mission!

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"Cultivating hope in children & families for a full life experience!"

“Cultivating hope in children & families for a full life experience!”

Sprout Pediatrics exists to cultivate hope in children and their families for a full life experience by surrounding them with  innovative therapy, education and connection within their community.

 

 It has been said that necessity is the mother of all invention and this is very true for an organization such as ours. For this reason we press the refresh button every once in a while to evaluate our purpose and path to successfully help children and their families with complex challenges.

For some time we have been trying to refine our mission statement as a reflection of our vision in an attempt to shape our organizational identity.

Starting with the end in mind, we strive towards a full life experience for our clients and their families to meet their full potential not just in therapy outcomes, but in living life to its fullest purpose and pleasure despite a possible disability.

In this endeavor it is easy to recognize that we are in a marathon and not a sprint. We often see families get tired, give up, become isolated and feel hopeless. If we are going to be successful, the tools we use must cultivate hope by using a more comprehensive approach through a variety of tools including innovative therapy, education and community connection.

As we continue to grow and develop our conventional therapy skills in the natural setting we are looking for new ways to innovate and educate our staff to achieve better outcomes. We believe by adding wellness opportunities through our relationship with organizations such as the YMCA we can transition children from a “staged” setting of activity into a more organic setting of activity that will create healthy habits for a lifetime. Additional benefits include socialization and community connection for child and family that will be supplemented through parent support groups that we are creating in partnership with the YMCA. Future plans will involve inclusion of children in regular activities through a “buddy” volunteer system wherever possible before delving into creating programs specially designed for people with developmental disabilities into early adulthood.

By investing time and effort in our social media outlets we hope to develop opportunities to educate and connect parents with each other and our staff in a way that does more than just disseminate information. We hope to be a vehicle for the exchange of ideas between families and amongst clinicians as we develop our clinical think tanks as well as screening services to the general public.

As we conclude our assessment, we feel affirmed in our plans that we must pursue a multi-tool approach for the best outcomes possible. Some of these tools are billable and some must be benevolent with the help of our community in order to make them cost effective. In the end, we believe that a full life is to be experienced by child, family and our organization alike and I can’t wait to see how it all plays out!

 

Will you join us?

Rhyno Coetsee PT, CEO

 

 

The Adventures of a Toddler with LCA: Lebra Congenital Amaurosis

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titleMany parents are forced to deal with their feelings, questions and concerns when they realize their baby or toddler has delays in development.  Listen to some of the questions Lena Amick had after learning her son Hunter had LCA or Lebra Congenital Amaurosis.  “I’m not sure how I felt … the first thing I thought about was if he will be able to go to regular school and make friends? Will he ever go hunting with his daddy?  Will he ever be able to make it out in the world when im not around?”  Such normal things we want for our children but yet when given the information your son has a rare (1 in 80,000) gene mutation that causes loss of vision at birth, we often don’t know what to do.  Lena did what most  mom’s do…reach out for help!

Because Hunter wasn’t walking, he qualified for Physical therapy with Sprout Pediatrics.  After being evaluated by Rhyno, our lead Physical Therapist, goals were written and Jessica Snipes, our Physical Therapy Assistant, began working with him.  Jessica shares, “at first I read a lot! Then we decided our priority would be helping Hunter capable of getting around in his environment.  Once Hunter had several months of PT and had learned to walk, do steps, etc we asked his EI to bring on a mobility instructor to introduce him to a cane.  It has taken some time and lots of creativity but he is starting to use it more.”

Hunter mastering steps!

Hunter mastering steps!

During therapy they would practice just walking around outside.  Giving him opportunities to learn how the ground changes, has holes and little  hills.  Jessica began to see how the cane could be used to help him explore and discover what he was near.  Jessica shares, “It is helpful for him to learn different sounds of things such as the difference of the sound of a wooden ramp vs a cement porch or brick step.  We have even started playing “hide and seek” with his cane so that he knows how to find something by sound.  I read a lot of research about how to train a child to use a cane but it also just takes a lot of repetition. His mobility instructor is training him a lot too.”

As many know, therapy is not just the hour one spends with the therapist, but the carry over practice that the family and caregiver’s do all week long that increases progress dramatically.  Hunter’s mom, Lena, is doing a great job practicing everything asked of her and every week she asks “what’s our homework this week?!” Lena shares her greatest joy has been “our PTA Jessica! Because of her, Hunter can walk, climb hills and do whatever he wants! If he didn’t have someone who truly cares, he definitely would not have come so far so quickly!”  Hunter is an explorer and confident in his abilities as just the other day he opened the door and headed outside without his mom even knowing! While he needs to be safe, it is exciting that he is independently functioning in and around his home.

Hunter heads outside down the ramp independently.

Hunter heads outside down the ramp independently.

Clearly it takes a team of professionals that deliver the total package, but Sprout Pediatrics exists to do exactly what Hunter and his family have experienced.  A caring team that pushes, encourages, researches and challenges! Both his parents are very happy with Hunters progress and are hopeful that one day Hunter will be able to see but for now they are doing a great job helping him explore his environment with touch and sound!

Below is a helpful guide to helping children with low vision.

Guide to Understanding more about helping Young Children with Low Vision